Production

Albums I've produced

It's taken 47 years, but Ensign Broderick's debut album is here

March 9, 2018 - 1:29am

https://nowtoronto.com/music/features/ensign-broderick-jason-sniderman-f...

Jason Sniderman started dreaming of rock stardom when he was eight and invented his musical alter ego, Ensign Broderick, when he was 12. Now, 47 years later, he’s finally ready to release his debut record.

Feast Of Panthers (out March 9 on Six Shooter) combines recently written material with songs Sniderman wrote over four decades ago but which haven’t seen the light of day until now.

Seated in a booth at a Vietnamese restaurant on Dundas West, Sniderman explains the origin story of his new wave persona. 

“It’s conceived and cultivated with a certain amount of innocence,” he says

Even the name bears the imprint of youth: “It just was a cooler-sounding name [than my own],” he smiles. “Ensign” rhymed with “Jensen,” the manufacturer of his favourite car.

There are a few contributing factors for the decades-long chasm between writing and releasing the music. One, he says, was that, when he played it for his friends in the 70s, reception was lukewarm at best. “Some of this music was just too weird for people back then.” 

The muted response was discouraging. “Dealing with indifference or negative responses for a long time, you build up some scar tissue,” he says. “That scar tissue isn’t easily worn away.”

BeatRoute: Art Bergmann: ‘Desperate times call for desperate songs’

September 5, 2014 - 8:26am

[Although his favorite albums are the three he did with Chris Wardman (Art Bergmann, Sexual Roulette, What Fresh Hell Is This?), he says “Drones” “is the best song I’ve ever written.”]

Full Story: beatroute.ca/2014/09/01/art-bergmann-desperate-times-call-for-desperate-songs

VANCOUVER — It’s been 19 years since Art Bergmann released his last recording, the Juno Award-winning What Fresh Hell is This? at which point he was simultaneously dropped from the label, quit music and later sold the statuette for dope money. Poignant as only Bergmann can be. The muse never left him. He kicked it out for a bit, and now he’s back, touring in support of his forthcoming four-song EP, Songs for the Underclass.

“Desperate times call for desperate songs,” says Bergmann who is in full control of his music for the first time and is also fighting for rights to his back catalogue. With that, he has created a masterpiece in “Drones of Democracy.” Although his favorite albums are the three he did with Chris Wardman (Art Bergmann, Sexual Roulette, What Fresh Hell Is This?), he says “Drones” “is the best song I’ve ever written.” Last FM recently played the track and the DJ remarked, “I don’t know who this is but he sounds like Tom Petty.” Slap.

Ruthless Ones

September 23, 2013 - 11:59pm

Digital Album
Immediate download of 2-track album in your choice of high-quality MP3, FLAC, or just about any other format you could possibly desire.
Free Download
1. We Couldnt Care, No 02:31
2. Devastating Jams 02:26

credits
released 26 July 2013
Mixed by Chris Wardman
Produced by Chris/Ruthless Ones

ttp://ruthlessones.bandcamp.com/album/2013-singles

The Star: Chalk Circle, The xx, !!! deliver this week’s Reasons to Live

June 11, 2013 - 9:28am

Chalk Circle all ripe for rediscovery with release of resurrected digital titles

Chalk Circle, The Great Lake, Mending Wall and As the Crow Flies (Deadbolt Music). Toronto’s Chalk Circle holds a very special place in my heart, as its first two releases, the 1986 EP The Great Lake — home to the indelible CanCon hits “April Fool” and “Me, Myself & I” — and 1987’s terrific Mending Wall, were two of the first records (actually cassettes) over which a certain New Brunswick teenager ever genuinely obsessed. As The Crow Flies, the band’s second and final album, is a goodie, too, but a little more muddled; Chalk Circle’s contradictory impulses towards stylish New Wave and the sort of earthier, activist-minded roots-rock embodied by the anti-Free Trade single “Sons and Daughters” were more polarized here than ever before, marking As the Crow Flies as a transitional record that, unfortunately, never transitioned to another. They’re all ripe for rediscovery right now, in any case, because the folks at Deadbolt Music have resurrected all three of Chalk Circle’s original Duke Street Record titles digitally so you can now delight anew in “This Mourning” and “N.I.M.B.Y.” and “Empty Park” and the band’s freak-hit cover of T. Rex’s “20th Century Boy” and all the other good stuff on your iPod.

Chalk Circle also plays one of its infrequent reunion gigs on Friday, June 7 at Lee’s Palace.

Full Story: The Star

Pages